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Is CBD Oil Kansas Legal? Cannabidiol Information 2021

cbd oil in kansas

Hemp was redefined as an agricultural commodity when the 2018 Farm Bill was made a law. The Bill removed hemp products, including CBD, from Schedule 1 substances. Though this was a significant step towards the legalization of cannabis, the Bill has caused confusion at the state level, especially to Kansas residents.

Before the law was enacted, residents had limited access to CBD oil products. However, Kansas has its Industrial Hemp Pilot Program that is supported by the Farm Bill. This means that consumers in Kansas can still buy CBD products. However, they are still required to adhere to strict regulations until the Kansas Department of Agriculture can regulate the hemp industry.

Historically, the FDA has always been strict with health content and claims that can be understood as medical advice – including CBD. Hence, hemp production or sale, including CBD, remains tightly regulated by federal law.

The Bill provides that individual states regulate or prohibit CBD cultivation and commerce. This is why most countries have attempted to regulate CBD in dietary supplements, beverage, food, and cosmetic products independent of FDA’s rules.

Hence, even though the plains and prairies of this Sunflower state remain entirely open to all sorts of agricultural advancements whether they be new technology, new seeds, or anything new that will boost the economy as well as the health benefits of the residents, there is a gray area when it comes to CBD.

Is CBD Oil Legal in Kansas?

Hard to say. This is because the laws around the legality of CBD in this State are contradictory. On paper, THC-free CBD oil is legal to Kansas residents. However, it’s difficult to find CBD oil with 0% THC. However, in July 2019, an amendment was made to the state hemp and cannabis laws to support the State’s fledgling industrial hemp program.

Kansas is one of the states that have their own list of items they consider part of Schedule 1 drugs, and all combinations and permutations of CBD, as well as its derivatives, can be found on their extensive list of banned items.

To take either of these items from the list requires a legal document that’s not only passed by the legislative but also signed by the Governor, and Kansas still doesn’t have any of these. Republic Governor Jeff Colyer signed a bill, SB 263, into law in April 2018. The Bill is also known as the Alternative Crop Research Act.

The wake of the Farm Bill 2014 allowed States to launch independent pilot programs to further research hemp viability as a crop. Hence, the KDA launched a program in partnership with Kansas’ public universities to allow and license farmers to grown hemp containing no more than 0.3% THC. In February 2019, the KDA published regulations for the research program.

Shortly after the Alternative Crop Research Act was passed, the Governor also signed another law in May 2018, SB 282, to amend the definition of marijuana to finally exempt CBD. It broadly legalized CBD products in Kansas but under the requirement that they contain 0% THC. This only complicates access to CBD because most CBD oil products contain at least 0.3% THC.

Democratic Governor Laura Kelly then signed another law in May 2019, SB 28, also known as Claire and Lola’s Law. The law prohibits child protection or child removal actions by giving parents or kids in possession of physician-recommended medical marijuana oil an affirmative defense. This is with the exception that the oil contains no more than 5% and has a lab test to prove the content.

However, CBD oil that is not THC-free can’t be purchased in Kansas. Hence patients lack access to CBD or medical marijuana for medical use. After the Farm Bill was passed, Kelly signed HB 2167 into law to legalize the creation of the Kansas Industrial Hemp Program.

Hence, to this date, the only acceptable CBD products in Kansas are those with 0% THC. All hemp cultivations must also be licensed by the KDA.

Why You Should Buy CBD Oil Kansas Online?

In Kansas, online is definitely the safest, easiest, and most convenient way to buy CBD oil products. Thanks to the Farm Bill, you can order CBD online and quickly have it delivered to your address in Kansas. However, if the products have more than 0% THC, know that you are definitely breaking the law.

Luckily, by buying online, you can easily confirm whether the product is THC-free by checking the brand’s third-party lab results. The lab results will reveal the type of oil and the amount of THC in the product. It will also show whether the hemp was organic, pesticide-free, chemical-free, and GMO-free.

You will also be able to access online reviews that will help you understand what to expect with the particular product you intend to buy. We recommend that you only order CBD-isolates if you live in this State because they contain no amount of THC.

Are you intending to buy CBD oil Kansas but you are not sure of the legal status of CBD in the Sunflower State. Find in stores buy online 2021.

Kansas law enforcement wary of legalizing 0.3% THC products

Friday

Kansans for Hemp co-founder Kelly Ripple said Friday state statute ought to be brought into compliance with federal law by legalizing products with up to 0.3% of the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis.

The 2018 farm bill signed by President Donald Trump authorized development of industrial hemp nationwide. It also exempted hemp from Schedule 1 definitions of marijuana in all 50 states. Essentially, the federal government legalized sale of 0.3% THC products.

Ripple said Kansas law enforcement restricted sale of cannabinoid products online or purchased elsewhere with as little as one hundredth of a percentage point of tetrahydrocannabinol or THC.

“It is time Kansas remove the unnecessary restriction of zero tolerance, especially given the reality farmers are allowed to now grow hemp domestically,” Ripple said.

Katie Whisman, executive officer of the Kansas Bureau of Investigation, said the idea was unsound. She said the state agency was opposed to Senate Bill 449 from a policy perspective and given financial and operational consequences of implementation.

“The threshold of legal versus illegal becomes then a question of science,” she said. “SB 449 not only applies to plant material, it would also apply to edibles, beverages and oils.”

Whisman said it would likely fall to the KBI Forensic Science Laboratory to performance analysis of all evidence samples to determine what products were under the legal limit and which crossed into illegal territory.

It could cost the state $682,000 in the first year of implementation and $487,000 per year going forward, the state budget director said.

The Kansas bill will go beyond federal law and can objectively be characterized as a vehicle for drug legalization, the KBI executive said.

“We remain adamantly opposed to any legislation that would propose to legalize marijuana and high concentration products,” Whisman said.

Ed Klumpp, a lobbyist for three law enforcement organizations in Kansas, said the legislation was “fraught with potential unintended consequences.”

The difficulty of field testing hemp products will make investigation of criminal cases more complex, he said.

“This will affect our ability to develop probable cause and perhaps even reasonable suspicion in other criminal cases, possibly resulting in suppression of evidence in a wide variety of criminal cases,” Klumpp said.

Kansans for Hemp co-founder Kelly Ripple said Friday state statute ought to be brought into compliance with federal law by legalizing products with up to 0.3% of the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis.The 2018 farm bill signed by President Donald Trump authorized development of industrial hemp nationwide. It also exempted hemp from Schedule 1 definitions of marijuana in all 50 states. Essentially, the federal government legalized sale of 0.3% THC products.Ripple said Kansas law enforcement