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how to make cbd oil for pain

How to Make CBD Oil

In a world of virtually endless CBD products, there’s something to be said for the people who want to go through the steps to make it at home. When you buy a bottle of CBD oil, you might feel a disconnect as to how a cannabis plant was transformed into the bottle of liquid you see in front of you.

Making CBD oil at home is actually a lot easier than it might seem. Once you understand the basics and have the right tools at your disposal, there’s not much standing in your way from creating your own personal batch of the good stuff.

The Only CBD Oil Recipe You’ll Ever Need

If you do a quick search, you’ll probably find hundreds of CBD oil recipes, each one as complicated as the next. If it’s your first time making CBD oil, it’s best to take a simple approach and gain a foundational knowledge of the process before you get fancy with the type of oil you make. Our CBD oil recipe is about as simple as it gets.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • CBD (cannabidiol) isolate or concentrate
  • Cooking oil (The best choices are coconut oil, MCT oil, olive oil, or canola oil)
  • Pot and Stove Top
  • Optional: Food thermometer

Step 1 – Gathering your ingredients

If you live in a state where growing is legal, you might have already gotten your hands on some marijuana seeds, and are planning your first grow. While this is a great way to take the entire process into your own hands, you don’t have to grow your own marijuana to make CBD oil.

With this recipe, we recommend you start with CBD isolate or concentrate. The purest CBD isolate usually comes in the form of crystals. If you’re having a hard time finding CBD crystals, we’ve made some recommendations for our favorite CBD crystals and concentrates. Check out that list here.

Once you have the CBD content, it’s time to choose a carrier oil. Depending on your preferences, you can select virtually any type of oil, but most people use either coconut oil, olive oil, or canola oil. If you want to use this CBD orally, it’s best to choose a carrier oil that you won’t mind tasting. If your main priority is for topical use, coconut oil works great on the skin and is not as pore-clogging as canola oil or olive oil.

The last thing you’ll need is a large pot and a stove or burner.

Step 2 – Mixing your ingredients

how to make cbd oil at home in your kitchen

Add 1 cup of your carrier oil to a pot. Put the pot on the stove, on low heat, and wait for the oil to simmer. You’ll know it’s ready when it starts to form small bubbles on the bottom of the pot. Then, crush 1 gram of your CBD crystals or concentrate into a powder form, and put the concentrate into the pot. Now, stir the mixture until the CBD has completely dissolved. To know your CBD is completely dissolved, there should be no more powder or chunks of crystal in the oil. If you notice that your crystals are not dissolving entirely, you can also use a cheesecloth to strain the oil and remove the excess crystals.

Note: Do not let the oil exceed 118°C/245°F, as this will burn the CBD. This is where a thermometer will come in handy. If you let your oil get too hot, the CBD will dissolve and burn, leaving you with just plain oil.

Step 3 – Let the mixture cool

Turn off the stove and let the mixture cool down in the same pot. Once the oil is cool, then you can transfer the oil into another container and store it at room temperature.

That’s it! If you follow the recipe, your final product will be 48 teaspoons of homemade CBD Oil at 20mg of CBD per serving. Of course, you can adjust the recipe to make higher or lower quantities. You can also add more isolate or crystals if you want to make a high-CBD blend.

To do this, simply divide the amount of CBD you used by the amount of oil you used in teaspoons. For example, 600mg of CBD isolate in 48 teaspoons(1 cup) of oil would result in potency of 12.5 mg CBD per teaspoon.

When stored at room temperature, CBD oil can last at least two months. If you want to extend its shelf life, you can also keep it in the fridge.

How to Use Homemade CBD Oil

We mentioned choosing a carrier oil that supports how you want to use the CBD you create. All four of the carrier oils we recommended (MCT, coconut, canola, olive) are edible, making any of them an excellent choice for adding CBD to your food or drink or taking the CBD orally. The benefits of CBD oil are endless, so you can use the oil you’ve made in a variety of ways.

Taking CBD oil orally

To take CBD orally, just add one teaspoon of the oil directly onto your tongue or into your favorite food or drink. Wait about 5-10 minutes after the first dose, and see if it’s working. If you need more, go ahead and take one more teaspoon, or a half, until you achieve your desired dose.

Cooking with CBD oil

If you don’t want to consume the oil directly, you can mask the taste and texture by cooking with it. The same way that you would use THC oil to make edibles like brownies and cookies, you can do the same with your THC oil. You can incorporate CBD oil into virtually any recipe that calls for oil. Depending on the quantity of what you’re cooking, you can swap out a few tablespoons of CBD oil with the cooking oil the recipe calls for.

Using CBD oil topically

Your homemade CBD oil can be applied directly onto your body to ease sore muscles, itchiness, or chronic pain. If the texture of the oil is not to your liking, you can also mix some CBD oil into a cream or salve and apply it the same way you usually would.

The Benefits of Making Your Own CBD Oil

Now that you know the “how,” let’s talk a little bit about the “why.”

Why would anyone choose to make their own CBD oil, when there are so many amazing brands on the market? Well, for the same reasons that people cook at home, and even grow marijuana at home. The benefits come down to price, quality control, and potency.

  • Price: A lot of what you pay for when buying CBD oil is branding. By making your own CBD oil, you can cut costs because all you need to do is obtain the raw materials to produce oil. While most oils around 1000mg can cost up to $150, you can make your own blend using our recipe for about $40.
  • Quality: CBD oil is still highly unregulated, making it hard to test for things like quality and consistency. In some cases, there might be added ingredients that a brand does not disclose on the bottle. The best way to know exactly what’s in your CBD oil is to make it yourself using natural ingredients.
  • Potency: The cost of high-potency CBD oil can be quite high. And even then, the strength listed might not be entirely representative of how well the blend will work for you. You can control the potency of your oil by formulating it yourself and testing different recipes to achieve your desired potency. You can also choose strains that contain specific potencies of other cannabinoids like cannabinol or cannabigerol.

The Downside of Making your own CBD oil

We’ve highlighted the benefits of making your own CBD oil, but the DIY route isn’t for everybody. Some downsides come with taking this process into your own hands, including missing out on professional oil extraction, fewer flavor and taste options, and a steep learning curve for first-timers.

  • Extraction: Retail CBD brands use professional extractors and extraction methods to remove the CBD from industrial hemp plants. These extractions result in a full spectrum range of cannabinoids and terpenes within the CBD. Our CBD oil recipe uses CBD isolate only. Depending on your needs, you may want broad-spectrum or full-spectrum CBD, which tends to be much harder to produce at home, with limited resources.
  • Time: If you value your time, you’ll likely want to buy CBD and have it delivered to your door. It can be fun to learn the process and go through the steps to make your own oil, but it can be a time-consuming process, especially for first-timers. If you have the budget and lack the time, it’s worth it just to order the tincture from a trusted seller.
  • Learning curve: On a similar note, you may have to experience the process a few times before the oil comes out perfectly to your liking. Even though our recipe is as simple as it gets, if you want to experiment with different quantities or potencies, there is a slight learning curve involved. Just as with regular cooking, you may end up making a mistake that ruins the entire batch forcing you to start over.
  • Flavors and options: One of the best things about CBD becoming more mainstream is the number of different flavors and CBD products on the market. YOu can find everything from flavored oil and gummies to CBD rice crispy treats, to CBD beverages. It’s not unheard of to make these things yourself (we even gave a few suggestions above), but for you to enjoy a CBD edible, you need to be able to produce high enough quantities and potencies of CBD for them to truly work. Sometimes it’s best to leave it to the professionals to enjoy the results of their many trials and errors.

Final Thoughts

There are hundreds of high-quality CBD oil brands on the market. (Trust us, we’ve tried A LOT of them). Learning how to make CBD oil at home is a great way to know exactly what’s going into the CBD oil you use, and save you some money along the way. If you’re a person who likes to learn new things and take on DIY projects at home, making CBD oil is a relatively low-risk project that can lead to pretty favorable results when done right. Our CBD oil recipe keeps it simple so that even kitchen novices can follow along and make their own blend. A with any new project you embark on, have patience in the process, and most of all, have fun!

Learn how to make CBD oil on your own. This straightforward recipe is perfect for beginners and outlines the steps to make high-quality CBD oil at home.

How to make CBD oil

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Contents

  1. What is CBD oil?
  2. History of CBD oil laws
  3. Making CBD oil
  4. Choosing an oil
  5. Dosing CBD oil
  6. Bottom line

What is CBD oil?

CBD oil is a refined hemp extract that has been added to a carrier oil. Hemp is a variety of cannabis that produces only trace amounts of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the cannabis component that can produce a psychoactive “high.” In fact, hemp is defined as having less than 0.3 % THC. Instead of producing THC, hemp plants contain mainly cannabidiol (CBD). Hemp has a long history of use for making fiber for textiles and rope, and has been bred to be tall and skinny with very small flowers, or buds.

CBD and weed

CBD oil is a refined hemp extract that has been added to a carrier oil. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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CBD and weed

The explosive popularity of non-intoxicating cannabis products containing CBD has led to the development of a booming $1 billion industry. Those who seek CBD’s medical benefits can consume a diversity of CBD-infused foods, supplements, and drinks. CBD oil has been used to treat wide-ranging symptoms, such as pain, anxiety, depression, and acne.

CBD additives come in many forms, but all fall into three major categories: CBD oil, CBD-rich cannabis oil, and CBD isolate. While “CBD oil” and “CBD-rich cannabis oil” may seem like two words for the same product, they differ significantly, mainly due to the fact that two distinct kinds of cannabis are used to make each.

History of CBD oil laws

The Marihuana Tax Act of 1937 made all cannabis varieties, including hemp, completely illegal, but the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill legalized the cultivation of hemp for fiber, while also legalizing the extraction of CBD from hemp if the hemp was grown in accordance with the law. This bill led to the rapid expansion of CBD products including oils, balms, creams, and gummies.. Interstate commerce of these products lies in a legal gray area because CBD and cannabis extracts are still considered a Schedule 1 narcotic, but the United States Drug Enforcement Agency has not enforced this regulation on businesses that sell CBD oil.

Making CBD oil

On a large scale, CBD oil is made by extracting entire hemp plants creating a crude paste, which is then refined in several ways and added to a carrier oil. Other minor cannabis components with some medical benefits, (such as cannabigerol (CBG), cannabichromene (CBC), and cannabidivarin (CBDV), are extracted alongside with CBD. Terpenes, the components responsible for the smell of cannabis and other flowers and plants, are sometimes reintroduced to harness additional medical benefits. Because CBD oil contains other components, it may be referred to as broad spectrum CBD oil, which reportedly has greater benefits than if CBD is taken on its own.

CBD oil is made by extracting entire hemp plants creating a crude paste, which is then refined in several ways and added to a carrier oil. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Making CBD-rich cannabis oil

This type of CBD product generally refers to a cannabis extract high in CBD that has not necessarily been added to a carrier oil. Instead of using hemp plants, this product is produced using drug-type cannabis plants bred to make mostly CBD, and little THC. Drug-type cannabis differs from hemp in that it has been bred for generations to make large buds coated in THC-rich cannabis resin that are prime for smoking and making into edibles and topical salves. While drug-type cannabis typically produces high levels of THC, interest in the medical benefits of CBD has motivated people to breed high-CBD plants. High-CBD drug-type cannabis produces much more CBD per plant than hemp does, but because of their lineage, they are not legal to grow under the 2018 Farm Bill. These CBD plants are, however, legal to grow in certain states with medical and recreational cannabis laws, and cannabis extracts made using these plants may be purchased in those states.

Making CBD isolate

CBD isolate is, in short, pure CBD. Isolate is made by refining CBD oil or CBD-rich cannabis oil. Due to the low cost of growing hemp versus high-CBD drug-type plants, CBD oil is often a cheaper source than CBD-rich cannabis oil for the production of CBD isolate. CBD isolate is a white, slightly sticky powder.

CBD isolate is a crystalline solid or powder that contains pure CBD. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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How to make CBD oil at home

To fully harness the medical benefits of CBD, customizing the consistency, potency, and carrier liquid of your of CBD oil for your needs is essential. The most straightforward and efficient way to make your own CBD oil is to start with CBD isolate, which is readily available in dispensaries and online from reputable sources. Another easy way to administer CBD oil is by dissolving it in alcohol, to make what is known as a tincture.

Tools for making CBD oil

Many of the tools needed for the home production of CBD oils or tinctures are likely to be things you already have in your kitchen or medicine cabinet. A jeweler’s scale that can measure grams two places past the decimal point is a must to accurately measure your CBD isolate and can be purchased fairly cheaply online. A spoon or small scoop will be needed to transfer the measured CBD isolate to a storage container. Additionally, you will need either oil or alcohol. The exact type will be your preference, but some properties of each need to be considered before making a purchase. The simplest way to dose the CBD oil or tincture precisely is by using a dropper bottle that indicates how much it delivers; these typically measure out 1 milliliter for the whole dropper. Measuring the oil or alcohol is most easily done with an oral syringe.

Choosing an oil

As CBD isolate is neutral in taste, the oil in which it is dissolved will dictate the flavor of the final product. An unflavored oil, such as medium chain triglyceride oil, commonly known as MCT oil, will make for a neutral tasting product. Strong-tasting oils, such as coconut and olive, may be used as well if desired. Coconut oil is often solid at room temperature as it has a high content of saturated fat, so it will need to be heated carefully for making CBD oil. If you’re making a tincture instead of an oil, a high grain alcohol is key. Liquor is diluted with water to an alcohol content of 40 -50 %, which is not suitable for dissolving CBD because of the high water content (CBD is not soluble in water). High-grain alcohol (90 % or greater) is needed for full incorporation.

As CBD isolate is neutral in taste, the oil in which it is dissolved will dictate the flavor of the final product. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Dosing CBD oil

The first crucial step in the process of making CBD oil or tinctures is deciding the desired potency. Assuming you want to administer your oil or tincture with a dropper bottle, it is necessary to know milligrams of CBD delivered per milliliter of oil/tincture. Most dropper bottles hold 1 fluid ounce (1 fluid ounce

30 milliliters). Dissolving 600 milligrams of CBD in 30 milliliters of liquid will make an oil/tincture that delivers 20 milligrams of CBD per milliliter (600 mg ÷ 30 mL = 20 mg/mL). To make a higher potency oil/tincture, dissolve more CBD in the same volume; the total milligrams of CBD you add, divided by the total volume of the oil/alcohol you add, will give you the potency in milligrams per milliliter (mg/mL).

CBD dropper

The first crucial step in the process of making CBD oil or tinctures is deciding the desired potency. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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CBD dropper

If you’re using any oil except for coconut, weigh the desired amount of CBD isolate on a notecard on your scale. Fold one edge of the notecard, place the folded angle into the edge of the dropper bottle, and carefully tap the notecard until the CBD falls into the bottle (do this over a clean tray to gather anything that may have fallen during the process). Pour your measured amount of oil or alcohol into the dropper bottle (30 milliliters or 1 fluid ounce if you follow the guide above). Shake and swirl; the heat from your hand will help dissolve the CBD, but it may take a few minutes. The final product is shelf-stable and ready to administer orally, into topicals, or into foods and drinks.

Due to its higher saturated fat content, coconut oil is mostly solid at room temperature (unless you’re in a very hot climate) and therefore cannot be administered with a dropper bottle. The coconut oil must be heated until liquid before dissolving the CBD. You can simply heat a measured amount of oil for your desired dose in a small pot or saucepan at a very low temperature. It is important to monitor the oil for signs of overheating and adjust the temperature accordingly. Alternatively, a double boiler can be used in place of a saucepan.

If you prefer to make a tincture but are concerned with the high alcohol content needed, glycerine can be used to dilute alcohol-based tinctures. CBD is not particularly soluble in glycerine on its own; however, CBD already dissolved in alcohol can be fully incorporated with glycerine to dilute or sweeten the tincture. Dosing will need to be adjusted with the addition of a larger volume of fluid. This can easily be done by making the initial tincture more potent and diluting it down with glycerine to your desired concentration.

Bottom line

You can channel the potential health benefits of CBD oil at home, but you should consult your physician before beginning a regimen and verify any applicable state or local laws.

How to make CBD oil Copy article link to clipboard. Link copied to clipboard. Contents What is CBD oil? History of CBD oil laws Making CBD oil Choosing an oil